Category Archives: Let Food be Your Medicine

Simple satisfying recipe: Roasted radishes with leeks

Sometimes I just want chips, dang it. Ever feel that way?

I don’t buy them except on rare occasions, so I make my own, thanks to a great tip Kathy Nace gave me a few years ago.

You can use pretty much any root vegetable. Add a leek, olive oil, salt and pepper, and it gets delicious.

All root vegetables are buried treasures, virtual storehouses of potassium, vitamin C, and other minerals. I don’t think I’d get any of those goodies from a bag of chips.

Last week,  I picked up some beautiful purple radishes at a local farm and decided it was time to bake with leeks.

 

 

 

I sliced them evenly for even backing and preheated my oven to 350 °. 

 

 

 

 

I mixed them in a bowl with olive oil. I am very picky about my oils. The seals on this bottle’s label tell what I look for when at the grocery store. You might have to hunt to find a bottle showing the California Olive Oil Council Certified Extra Virgin seal on the left of this label.

I added salt and pepper. You can try adding a variety of things to change up the flavor–herbs like thyme, spices like cumin, and garlic is yummy … this time I just wanted something quick and simple.

I spread the roots on a baking sheet.

 

 

 

 

I roasted them for about 30 minutes, stirred, and roasted for another 20 or 30, until crisp-tender.

Mmmm!

Source: Thriver Soup, pg. 143-144.

“Thrive Global” interview on cultivating well-being

Heidi Bright of ‘Bright Concepts’:
“Exhale slowly through your right nostril”
Photo by Laura Dague Dailey

When I feel good, I find it much easier to eat nutritious foods. When I feel like crap, I am drawn to crappy food to self-soothe, but it always backfires and I end up feeling worse. One way to circumvent this tendency is to allow myself a small amount of the junk food — like a small handful […]

Brain Hackers and I discuss “brain training” to manage emotions

Two-time Guinness Record holder for greatest memory, Dave Farrow, and I discuss

  • how to manage emotions from a brain perspective;
  • managing stress; and
  • reducing inflammation

in this 18-minute episode. Enjoy!

Episode 123 – Heidi Bright – Author Thriver Soup

How to Make a Delicious, Cancer-Fighting Valentine’s Treat

Valentine’s Day gives rise the urge to eat sugary treats. Unfortunately, processed sugar causes inflammation, which is not good for those dealing with cancer.

Here’s a satisfying way around the sugar shackles that I enjoy. It’s naturally sweet, creamy, quick, easy, nutritious, and even color-coordinated.

And best of all, it can help fight cancer.

All it takes is a high-speed blender with a pusher, some frozen red berries, and a banana.

I consider my high-speed blender a vital part of my anti-cancer lifestyle. I use mine daily for green smoothies, and sometimes I’ll use it three times in one day. I am fortunate that my brother Walter gave me a Vitamix after my diagnosis. I believe using it provides my body with access to fresh, vital nutrients I might not get any other way.

Red berries are nutritional powerhouses. They boost the immune system and provide cell-protecting antioxidants. Raspberries and strawberries contain especially high amounts of ellagic acid, a phytochemical that interferes with cancer development. [1]

Bananas contain vitamin B6 (good for dealing with neuropathy), fiber, potassium (especially important during chemo, I found), magnesium, vitamin C, and manganese.[2]

Cut your peeled banana in half and stick both halves in the bottom of your blender.

 

 

 

 

Measure out 2 cups of frozen berries and pour them on top.

 

 

 

 

Turn on your blender and use your pusher to get the fruit to mix.

 

 

 

 

Viola! A delicious, sweet, creamy, frozen dessert for Valentine’s Day.

 

 

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Sources:

[1] Thriver Soup, pg.  117

[2] www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/food-features/bananas/

10 Ways to Reduce Inflammation

Perhaps a good defense against Covid-19, and cancer, is a good offense: reduce inflammation in the body. https://thriversoup.com/2020/05/09/protecting-from-covid-19/ Here are my first ten ways, all found in my book, Thriver Soup.

(Always discuss with your doctor before starting anything new)

 #1 Tart Cherries
“Tart cherries are high in antioxidants, which help reduce inflammation.”
Thriver Soup, Pg. 124

#2 Quercetin
“The flavonoid #quercetin ‘has demonstrated anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects. Quercetin turns the twelve milligrams of vitamin C in the apple into the equivalent of 1,500 milligrams of vitamin C.’”
Thriver Soup, Pg. 114

#3 Moving Our Bodies
“Moving our bodies can help balance our hormones, reduce blood sugar levels, reduce inflammation, decrease fatigue, protect our immune systems, and reduce the risks of recurrence.”
Thriver Soup, Pg. 172

#4 Blueberries
“Blueberries are high in flavonoids, which have powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.”
Thriver Soup, Pg. 117

#5 Curcumin
“Curcumin works against cancer development in at least ten different ways, affecting each stage of the disease. It offers powerful antitumor, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. It stimulates the immune system. It blocks the formation of blood vessels to tumors while promoting the flow of blood to wounds. Turmeric intensifies the anti-cancer activity of other plant-based nutrients, especially green tea and black pepper. It enhances the effectiveness of chemotherapy.”
Thriver Soup, Pg. 119

#6 Bay Leaves
“Bay leaf contains parthenolide, shown to slow the appearance and growth of breast tumors in mice in a Russian study. This anti-inflammatory is a potent anti-oxidant.”
Thriver Soup, Pg. 127

#7 Citrus Fruit
“Citrus fruits have anti-inflammatory flavonoids and stimulate the detoxification of carcinogens by the liver.”
Thriver Soup, Pg. 124

#8 Pomegranates
“Pomegranates are full of polyphenols, are anti-inflammatory, contain antioxidants, and have other anti-cancer components.”
Thriver Soup, Pg. 124

#9 Coriander Seeds
“Coriander seeds appear to relieve constipation as well as help prevent colon cancer. Their anti-inflammatory properties protect against nerve damage. They also might lower blood sugar and increase the release of insulin from the pancreas.”
Thriver Soup, Pg. 125-6

#10 Flax Seeds
“Flax seeds are a rich plant source of omega-3 fatty acids which reduce inflammation, and of lignans, which can retard the growth of cancerous cells. Researchers found that women who consumed the most lignans had the lowest risk of breast cancer. Lignans also appear to enhance the benefits of the chemotherapy drug tamoxifen. Flax seeds need to be ground and immediately consumed for humans to gain access to their nutrients. Eating cereals and chips containing flax seeds probably won’t provide the benefits for which you might be looking. They might, however, provide more fiber, which is useful.”
Thriver Soup, Pg. 126

 

How Can We Help Protect Ourselves from Covid-19?

How can we help protect ourselves from Covid-19 when our bodies are already vulnerable because of cancer?

Almost every disease in older adulthood is made worse by inflammation in our bodies, according to Chris Fagundes, an assistant professor of psychological sciences at Rice University. [1]

Inflammation appears to play a role in Covid-19. This virus turns deadly when the body overreacts to the invasion and creates a “cytokine storm.” According to Randy Cron, M.D., Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham, “Cytokines are inflammatory immunologic proteins that are there to fight off infections and ward off cancers… But when they are out of control, they can make you very ill.” [2]

Therefore, perhaps a good defense against Covid-19, and cancer, is a good offense: reduce inflammation in the body.

In addition to my 26 tips for improving immunity to help prevent contracting the virus (which you can find on my blog, all from my book, Thriver Soup), I will next be offering dozens of tips for reducing inflammation in our bodies to help us all stay a little healthier.

Here is a primer on inflammation, which is one of hundreds of reflections I offer in Thriver Soup:

“When threatened by wounds, irritation, or infections, cells inflame to assist with the transition back to health. A molecule called nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kB), which normally resides in cell cytoplasm, moves into the cell’s nucleus (hence the name ‘nuclear factor’) and generates redness, heat, swelling, and pain. When the body heals, the NF-kB molecules return to the cell cytoplasm.

“NF-kB, however, also provokes the genes involved in creating chronic inflammation, which generally does not help the body heal. Instead, long-term heat and swelling becomes an open invitation to cancer. One-sixth of all cancers are directly linked to chronic inflammation. Most, if not all, cancers have unusually high levels of active NF-kB. This protein is considered their missing link. Researchers, for example, found that NF-kB regulates the inflammatory cascade necessary for breast cancer cells to proliferate and metastasize.

“Fortunately, inflammation can be smothered through diet and supplements. NF-kB can be suppressed by phytochemical-rich spices, vegetables, and fruit. Antioxidants can block the proteins so they don’t move into cell nuclei. Vitamins C, D, and E, curcumin (found in the spice turmeric), the herb ashwagandha, pomegranate extract, garlic extract, ginger root, green tea, omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil, and isoflavones found primarily in beans can be effective cellular firefighters. I found such a diet helped reduce my discomfort during treatment, decreasing my need for pain medications.

“When brought back under control, NF-kB provides the body with important healing mechanisms…. Keep the chronic flames doused with an anti-inflammatory diet to help preserve your internal landscape.

Thriver Soup Ingredient:

“Ask your doctor to measure inflammation markers in your blood (C-reactive protein and albumin). ‘Patients with the lowest level of inflammation were twice as likely as the others to live through the next several years,’ according to long-term studies by oncologists at the Glasgow Hospital in Scotland.

“Talk to your oncologist about what anti-inflammatory foods and supplements work well with your treatment choices.”

Thriver Soup, Pg. 174

Other sources:

[1] [https://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2018/10/30/new-research-on-inflammation-shows-how-extreme-emotions-can-undermine-health/#4bc491af56f5]

[2] [https://www.forbes.com/sites/claryestes/2020/04/16/what-is-the-cytokine-storm-and-why-is-it-so-deadly-for-covid-19-patients/#6b77ed6460fc]

Another 6 Ways to Improve Your Immunity

“One study demonstrated that significant changes take place in the brains of those who practice mindfulness meditation, even after only eight weeks of daily practice. Their moods lifted and their immune systems were strengthened.”
Thriver Soup, pg. 314

“According to Donald Yance, herbalist and certified nutritionist, licorice also blocks tumors and enhances the immune system. If you have any high blood pressure issues, I suggest using licorice in which the DGL (glycyrrhetinic acid) has been removed.”
Thriver Soup, pg. 149

“So maybe having a treat every so often is a way to increase the joy in life and give a little boost to the immune system. Denying myself an occasional treat isn’t terribly nurturing for the soul.”
Thriver Soup, pg. 150

“Probiotics in general can facilitate digestion, help the gut maintain regular bowel movements, stabilize the immune system, and assist with detoxification.”
Thriver Soup, pg. 140

“Reishi mushrooms can increase white blood cell and tumor-fighting cell production, cut off the growth of new blood vessels to tumors, and reduce the migration of cancerous cells. They have been known to decrease the toxicity created by chemotherapy drugs. When looking for a supplement, select one with a higher level of triterpenoids, which provides the most benefit. The more bitter the tea or tincture, the more potent it is. The recommended dose is three to five grams per day, or ten to thirty drops.”
Thriver Soup, pg. 134

“Don’t sprout alfalfa seeds, said Sally Fallon in Nourishing Traditions. The resulting sprouts promote inflammatory illnesses and suppress the immune system.”
Thriver Soup, pg. 133

How to make a quick green smoothie

Do you feel like you lack the time and/or energy to make green smoothies? Are you having trouble meeting your quota of three to five servings of dark leafies every day?

Salad greens in a high-speed blender

Here’s a simple smoothie you can make if you have a high-speed blender. It provides dark leafy greens and green tea. One of my brothers even tried it and said it wasn’t bad… that it tasted like foam.

Dark leafies contain beta-carotene, vitamin C, folic acid, and important trace minerals.

green tea
green tea

The main advantage of green tea lies in its polyphenol, EGCG (epigallocatechin gallate). EGCG influences what DNA codes are expressed inside cells. Green tea has been shown to stimulate the immune system, inhibit metastasis, reduce inflammation, provide anti-oxidants, promote the effectiveness of radiotherapy, and detoxify the body. It can even help increase bone density (Thriver Soup, pg. 149).

Of course, talk with your health care provider first (especially if you are on blood thinners).

simple green smoothie
simple green smoothie

Simply load up your blender with salad greens, then add some freshly made green tea cooled with ice. Blend and serve. Viola! Power-packed vitality for your body.

Watch Thriver Soup on Local12 WKRC and enter to win a free copy!

“What’s Happening in Health” with anchor Liz Bonis featured Thriver Soup on Sunday. It starts around minute 16.

https://local12.com/health/whats-happening-in-health/whats-happening-in-health-november-11-2018?fbclid=IwAR26OaY-pqg55iemxeuvmD7dNjMsgRPmNRdZKc5BgwQ9s05Vbx_oMZL0H-U

Be a lucky winner! Like and share Caitlin Wells’s Facebook post about her drawing to win a free signed copy of Thriver Soup! Saturday join Caitlin Wells and me at the Healing Inspirations Center booth at Victory of Light, Sharonville Convention Center. https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1123398107784978&set=p.1123398107784978&type=3&theater

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1123398107784978&set=p.1123398107784978&type=3&theater

Photo by James Harrison